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How to Make Icing Roses
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How to Make Icing Roses


Create this magnificent rose - the most popular icing flower of them all. With practice, your roses will have the just-picked look of real fresh garden roses!
Skill Level: None

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Step 1
Step 1

Make the rose base, using tip 12 and Flower Nail #7. Hold the bag straight up, the end of tip 12 slightly above the center of your waxed paper-covered flower nail, which is held in your other hand. Using firm and steady pressure, squeeze out a heavy base of icing, remembering to keep your tip buried as you squeeze. Gradually raise the tip, and decrease the pressure.

Step 2
Step 2

Stop pressure, pull up and lift away. The rose base should be 1 1/2 times as high as the rose tip opening.

Step 3
Step 3

Make the center bud, using tip 104. Hold nail containing base in your left (right) hand and bag with rose tip 104 in right (left) hand. Bag should be at a 45° angle to the flat surface of the nail and in the 4:30 (7:30) position. The wide end of the tip should touch the cone of the icing base at or slightly below the midpoint, and the narrow end of the tip should point up and angle slightly inward.

Step 4
Step 4

Now you must do 3 things at the same time: squeeze the bag, move the tip and rotate the nail. As you squeeze the bag, move the tip up from the base, forming a ribbon of icing. Slowly turn the nail counterclockwise (clockwise for lefties) to bring the ribbon of icing around to overlap at the top of the mound, then back down to starting point.

Step 5
Step 5

Move your tip straight up and down only; do not loop it around the base. Now you have a finished center bud.

Step 6
Step 6

Make the top row of 3 petals. Touch the wide end of tip to the midpoint of bud base, narrow end straight up.

Step 7
Step 7

As you turn the nail the up and down motion of the tip will make a half circle-shaped upright petal. Wide end of tip must touch the rose base so that petal will attach. Move tip up and down to the midpoint of mound, forming the first petal.

Step 8
Step 8

Start again, slightly behind end of first petal, and squeeze out second petal. Repeat for the third petal, ending by overlapping the starting point of the first petal. Rotate the nail 1/3 turn for each petal.

Step 9
Step 9

Make the middle row of 5 petals. Touch the wide end of tip slightly below center of a petal in the top row. Angle the narrow end of tip out slightly more than you did for the top row of petals. Squeeze bag and turn nail moving tip up, then down, to form first petal.

Step 10
Step 10

Repeat for a total of 5 petals, rotating the nail 1/5 turn for each petal.

Step 11
Step 11

The last petal end should overlap the first´s starting point.

Step 12
Step 12

Make the bottom row of 7 petals. Touch the wide end of tip below the center of a middle row petal, again angling the narrow end of tip out a little more. Squeeze bag and turn nail to end of fingers, moving tip up, then down to form first petal.

Step 13
Step 13

Repeat for a total of 7 petals, rotating the nail 1/7 turn for each petal.

Step 14
Step 14

The last petal end should overlap the first´s starting point. Slip waxed paper and completed rose from nail.

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Stiff consistency Buttercream icing

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Standard Coupler

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How to Make a Buttercream Rose
Watch: How to Make a Buttercream Rose

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How to Make Icing Roses is rated 4.6 out of 5 by 109.
Rated 3 out of 5 by from I am looking forward to trying to make roses. It looks a bit difficult but that may be because I haven't tried to make them yet. Once I have a project like this in mind, I don't give up until I conquer it.
Date published: 2013-04-08
Rated 5 out of 5 by from I love these so pretty
Date published: 2013-03-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from they are lovely flowers.but there so hard to make!there 60% easy,40% hard
Date published: 2012-08-12
Rated 5 out of 5 by from I found these instructions easy to follow! It's a bit daunting at first, but once you get going it's suprisingly easy. I find the best way to make these roses is to use the Wilton recipe for buttercream icing (I use a full cup of margarine instead of 1/2 shortening) and when you make the rose base, stick it in the freezer for a couple of minutes to make it nice and firm. After you freeze them a little bit, they are much easier to work with!
Date published: 2012-05-09
Rated 4 out of 5 by from I had to make cupcakes in foods class and the winner got a free chocolate making kit. I practiced throughout the week at home. It took some practice but my finale product looked like a rose. Thanks a lot:)
Date published: 2012-04-20
Rated 5 out of 5 by from This took me a million tries, but when I finally got my perfect Wilton rose, I knew it was well worth the 2 hours I spent perfecting it! It really is a beautiful creation and it's amazing what you can with icing, a little patience, and a great teacher (thanks to Mary DeChick)!
Date published: 2011-06-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from I had a bit of difficulty getting the hang of this. I found that my icing was too dry. So I remade my icing but used milk instead of water. I also thinned out the icing just a touch. After you've made a few roses, you'll need to put the bag in the fridge because your hand will heat up the icing, making it too soft.
Date published: 2011-05-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Made these for a birthday cake over the weekend. Everyone raved about how cute they were. These are definitely a little tricky if you have no clue on what you're doing but once you get the hang of it, its definitely easier. Make sure you have the correct type of frosting or you will have droopy roses. I also didn't use the recommended tip 104 and actually used tips 116 and 97 to get the same look as the picture and for different size flowers.
Date published: 2011-05-13
Rated 4 out of 5 by from These were not as easy to work with. I did find a tip that using a hershey kiss in the center really helps to learn build the petals around it. It really is important to have stiff consistency icing.
Date published: 2011-05-12
Rated 5 out of 5 by from It was through and very easy to follow. I practiced and caught on real quick. Very helpful.
Date published: 2011-02-11
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Roses are fun to make. I was taught how to make roses more than 20 years ago by my mother. I am now teaching my daughter how to make them. Once you know what you are doing and have the right tools these don't take as long as you would think. However, I definitely reccommend that you practice several times. Practice makes perfect. :-)
Date published: 2011-01-13
Rated 4 out of 5 by from I entered a cake in the Coe Hill fair over the summer and I decided that i would try the Royal Roses on my cake. At first i found them a bit difficult to make. They kept falling down on me. I found that my icing wasn't thick enough. But after awhile of playing with the icing I finally was able to make a rose. But i also found that if I just left them on the table they would kinda melt down. So I started putting them in the fridge and let them set over night before i put them on my cake. It worked and i won first place for my cake. I still need practice with making the roses, but im not going to give up.
Date published: 2010-12-08
Rated 3 out of 5 by from I found that the Royal Icing rose is the easiest to make, of icing roses. They seem to have a better stability than buttercream. It takes me about 5 bad roses before I get the right shape and then they turn out rather quickly.
Date published: 2010-12-06
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Just need to practice making them.
Date published: 2010-12-06
Rated 5 out of 5 by from to make a rose is very easy because their is no exact pattern to it. just follow the technic and it will come out right. their are no two roses that are exactly the same so your rose will always be right.
Date published: 2010-12-06
Rated 5 out of 5 by from for the first time, make one rose i need trial and error for a couples of time, by watching the video, and finally hurry...i make it... thank you, anik
Date published: 2010-12-06
Rated 4 out of 5 by from I learned that it is a practice makes perfect more like near perfect in my case ;) Once i got the consistency right and my hand in the right position i loved the outcome. it is a bit of trial and error so make sure you have time to practice.
Date published: 2010-12-06
Rated 4 out of 5 by from I actually found them a bit difficult to get the hang of. Make sure your icing is the proper consistency so the rose don't slide down the cone. Always, I made them too low on the cone and then they were too flat. Always make sure your cone is big enough and dried thoroughly!! before starting your rose. It's easier to get a nice rose on a tall cone than on a shorter one. With practice you can do it.
Date published: 2010-12-06
Rated 5 out of 5 by from As long as you get your had positions right you will love to make these roses. Once you make them and put on your cake its wonderful to look back and say wow I just made that cake. :)
Date published: 2010-12-06
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Practice and the right consistency icing make perfect. I always let my roses dry overnight before transfering the roses to whatever I am decorating.
Date published: 2010-12-06
Rated 5 out of 5 by from I'm just learning how to make flowers this help with my roses I like the step by step I know with practice I will get better
Date published: 2010-12-06
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Ive used this way to make roses on my daughters friend graduation cake with straight lines for stems and used the bow to "tie " up the roses on the cake it does take practice to make the roses but the results are pretty.
Date published: 2010-12-06
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Instead of using tip 12 to make the "mound" on which you build the rose, I have always used tip 104 to make a more triangular shaped mound. Then I don't have to change tips or bags so I can make the roses faster. And since it is covered by the petals, it doesn't matter that it isn't round. It works great!
Date published: 2010-12-06
Rated 5 out of 5 by from at first when i started trying to make roses it was hard , and i wasn't sure if i would be able to make them , But i sat at my table with practise icing, and followed your Wiltons directions, and it only took me 2 days to catch on, Now Roses are my favorite thing to put on my cakes, i want to make Bigger and better roses.
Date published: 2010-12-06
Rated 5 out of 5 by from I never thought I could make flowers like this. I took a Wilton class and I couldn't believe how easy it was! I've always baked and decorated cakes, but I really learned a lot in class. One tip I learned was that your frosting has to be the right consistency. Too soft, and they blob out; too firm, and the edges crack. I make these out of both buttercream and royal icings and they look great.
Date published: 2010-12-06
Rated 4 out of 5 by from I love making these. They become easier the more you do, but I find that my hand cramps after a while. The WMI who taught these in my class gave us all Hershey's kisses to remind us what the inner base should look like when we practice at home. These Roses are classic and traditional, and pretty much the first thing that comes to mind when I think of buttercream flowers.
Date published: 2010-12-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from I learned to make roses working at Dairy Queen. But once I learned them in class, they just look so much better. I like to put a stripe of color in my bag that comes out on the tip of the rose petals. Well, at least everyone in class liked it. :)
Date published: 2010-12-05
Rated 2 out of 5 by from I can't get the hang of the icing rose! It looks nice, but mine always falls over before it even looks like a rose! But the first time I tried a gum paste rose- it looked great! This one will just takes lots of practice I guess!
Date published: 2010-12-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Love this for everything. Roses on cakes, and cupcakes!
Date published: 2010-12-05
Rated 4 out of 5 by from I loved the Wilton video, it showed step by step instructions on how to 'build' a rose. It came out beautiful. I will certainly make these again.
Date published: 2010-12-05
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