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How to Make Icing Roses Zoom

How to Make Icing Roses


Create this magnificent rose - the most popular icing flower of them all. With practice, your roses will have the just-picked look of real fresh garden roses!
Skill Level: None

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Step 1
Step 1

Make the rose base, using tip 12 and Flower Nail #7. Hold the bag straight up, the end of tip 12 slightly above the center of your waxed paper-covered flower nail, which is held in your other hand. Using firm and steady pressure, squeeze out a heavy base of icing, remembering to keep your tip buried as you squeeze. Gradually raise the tip, and decrease the pressure.

Step 2
Step 2

Stop pressure, pull up and lift away. The rose base should be 1 1/2 times as high as the rose tip opening.

Step 3
Step 3

Make the center bud, using tip 104. Hold nail containing base in your left (right) hand and bag with rose tip 104 in right (left) hand. Bag should be at a 45° angle to the flat surface of the nail and in the 4:30 (7:30) position. The wide end of the tip should touch the cone of the icing base at or slightly below the midpoint, and the narrow end of the tip should point up and angle slightly inward.

Step 4
Step 4

Now you must do 3 things at the same time: squeeze the bag, move the tip and rotate the nail. As you squeeze the bag, move the tip up from the base, forming a ribbon of icing. Slowly turn the nail counterclockwise (clockwise for lefties) to bring the ribbon of icing around to overlap at the top of the mound, then back down to starting point.

Step 5
Step 5

Move your tip straight up and down only; do not loop it around the base. Now you have a finished center bud.

Step 6
Step 6

Make the top row of 3 petals. Touch the wide end of tip to the midpoint of bud base, narrow end straight up.

Step 7
Step 7

As you turn the nail the up and down motion of the tip will make a half circle-shaped upright petal. Wide end of tip must touch the rose base so that petal will attach. Move tip up and down to the midpoint of mound, forming the first petal.

Step 8
Step 8

Start again, slightly behind end of first petal, and squeeze out second petal. Repeat for the third petal, ending by overlapping the starting point of the first petal. Rotate the nail 1/3 turn for each petal.

Step 9
Step 9

Make the middle row of 5 petals. Touch the wide end of tip slightly below center of a petal in the top row. Angle the narrow end of tip out slightly more than you did for the top row of petals. Squeeze bag and turn nail moving tip up, then down, to form first petal.

Step 10
Step 10

Repeat for a total of 5 petals, rotating the nail 1/5 turn for each petal.

Step 11
Step 11

The last petal end should overlap the first´s starting point.

Step 12
Step 12

Make the bottom row of 7 petals. Touch the wide end of tip below the center of a middle row petal, again angling the narrow end of tip out a little more. Squeeze bag and turn nail to end of fingers, moving tip up, then down to form first petal.

Step 13
Step 13

Repeat for a total of 7 petals, rotating the nail 1/7 turn for each petal.

Step 14
Step 14

The last petal end should overlap the first´s starting point. Slip waxed paper and completed rose from nail.

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Stiff consistency Buttercream icing

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Standard Coupler

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How to Make Icing Roses is rated 4.5607476635514015 out of 5 by 107.
Rated 5 out of 5 by from One of the lessons in the 1st Wilton decorating class is how to make these roses! I was really amazed at how simple they've become after a little bit of practice. I make these roses for my cakes all the time, and they give it a beautiful look. The trick is really the icing consistency- too thin and the petals won't stand up, too thick and your hand hurts too much squeezing the bag! I once made cupcakes for my daughter's class and put a rose on each cupcake! I also don't use waxed paper on my nail, but put the icing directly on the nail and then use the "Flower Lifter" to transfer the flower to the cake.
Date published: 2010-12-03
Rated 4 out of 5 by from I entered a cake in the Coe Hill fair over the summer and I decided that i would try the Royal Roses on my cake. At first i found them a bit difficult to make. They kept falling down on me. I found that my icing wasn't thick enough. But after awhile of playing with the icing I finally was able to make a rose. But i also found that if I just left them on the table they would kinda melt down. So I started putting them in the fridge and let them set over night before i put them on my cake. It worked and i won first place for my cake. I still need practice with making the roses, but im not going to give up.
Date published: 2010-12-08
Rated 5 out of 5 by from When I watch the instructors, cake decorators, video's, etc make buttercream roses ~ I think to myself NO PROBLEM! If they can make that look so simple then yes ~ even I can do that! Base, Pressure, Lift. and for the Buds ~ Squeeze, Move, Rotate. Voila! A Rose! Ok, so, maybe more a globbbbb of delicious Wilton buttercream!!!! Until of course, I practiced, practiced, practiced ... & once I got the hang of it ~ YES!!! Now I can do as my great Aunt Margie did and gift box dozens of PERFECT buttercream Roses for all the sweet tooths in my family!!!! Patience gets the job done. Thank you Wilton! :)
Date published: 2010-11-30
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Yours will NOT look like wilton at first. This is one of those do it 100 times and it will click at some point. All the decorators I've talked to have their own little tricks to make this work the best for them. One trick I've heard a lot of... Make your rose on the end of a chopstick, and each layer of petals you move down a little and it looks like a pinecone...then you take scissors and gently from the bottom up...push the rose up and off the stick. When you're done it blooms nicely into a rose. Just keep trying. Practice, and you'll get it!
Date published: 2010-12-01
Rated 5 out of 5 by from I had tried making roses before that never worked. It turned out the most important part of it is the consistency of the buttercream!( I only used butter, no shortening) Even though the wedding was in January, it was in the Florida Keys, so I kept the roses in refrigeration until just before the reception before placing them on the cake. I watched this video as well as the shell border, leaves, ribbons and bows and made my first wedding cake! I lived in an area not accessible to classes so I totally relied on Wilton.com. The 3 tiered cake turned out beautifully. I have since moved and have been able to take all three levels of the classes, but the site really has been my best resource.
Date published: 2010-12-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Made these for a birthday cake over the weekend. Everyone raved about how cute they were. These are definitely a little tricky if you have no clue on what you're doing but once you get the hang of it, its definitely easier. Make sure you have the correct type of frosting or you will have droopy roses. I also didn't use the recommended tip 104 and actually used tips 116 and 97 to get the same look as the picture and for different size flowers.
Date published: 2011-05-13
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Ahhhh ROSES! When all else fails, I go straight for the roses. After a lot of practice practice practice and more practice, it's the one flower I have been able to call my signature. Hint: the icing must be consistent. I use Wilton's butter cream icing recipe every time and it has never failed me http://www.wilton.com/recipe/Buttercream-Icing . I sometimes save my roses on the wax paper and pick the best ones or go ahead and use little scissors to transfer them directly to my cake from the nail. Definitely a technique worth learning. Everyone loves roses!
Date published: 2010-12-03
Rated 2 out of 5 by from I can't get the hang of the icing rose! It looks nice, but mine always falls over before it even looks like a rose! But the first time I tried a gum paste rose- it looked great! This one will just takes lots of practice I guess!
Date published: 2010-12-05
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