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Topic Title: Attaching fondant decor to buttercream
Created On Saturday July 07, 2012 8:17 AM
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Self taught love to learn
Posts: 12
Posted: Saturday July 07, 2012 8:17 AM

I am planning to use marshmallow fondant to make a few small cut out shapes for decoration to be added onto a buttercream frosting cake. What is the best way (water, vanilla, cake glue are just a few thoughts i had) to attach these shapes to my buttercream frosting? Also is fondant the way to go or should i be using gumpaste for these added decorations? i am doing a country theme cake so i will be cutting out a few small horseshoes to add to the tiers of the cake.

 
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cakedujour
Posts: 20312
Posted: Saturday July 07, 2012 8:58 AM
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To attach fondant decorations to a buttercream cake just use a few dots of buttercream. To attach them to a fondant cake, I prefer to use a film of shortening. You can use buttercream, edible glue, or water, but I like shortening because it gives you some flexibility if you decide to move the decoration at all. The shortening would be reabsorbed by the fondant where the other options would likely leave a mark.

Straight fondant is fine for many decorations. For things that do not lay flat, like bows or figures for instance, do better when the fondant is mixed with a little tylose powder or gumtex. Or you can make a 50-50 mix of gumpaste and fondant. This adds strength to the piece and helps it dry faster.

If your horseshoes will be following the curve of the cake, straight fondant is ok. Roll it, cut them out, and place them in an airtight container so they will be flexible until it is time to put them on the cake. If the horseshoes will be flat and leaning against the tiers, then I would mix in just a bit of tylose or gumtex. If you wanted to, you could paint them with a mix of silver luster dust and vodka, lemon juice, or everclear. For black, use black food color instead of the luster dust.

Straight gumpaste is most often used to make realistic flowers, or other very thin decorations that you might need.

Welcome to the forum!
 
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Self taught love to learn
Posts: 12
Posted: Saturday July 07, 2012 9:12 AM

THANK YOU THANK YOU! This helps so much i cant explain! i am not familiar with gumpaste where do u buy the tylose or gumtex? i assume michaels or any cake store? i am thinking about doing the horse shoes black as the bride has also requested barbwire decorations that are black on the cake. any ideas or have you ever made barbwire?
 
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cakedujour
Posts: 20312
Posted: Saturday July 07, 2012 9:33 AM
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You can buy Wilton gumtex at the craft store. A cake store should have that and tylose powder. That is my first choice because it is pretty cheap and works very well. You can certainly use either one with good results.

Preetscake made a very cool barbed wire cake recently; in this thread you can see photos and she describes how she made it.

An extruder is a very cool tool to have in your arsenal and is invaluable for things like this. You can find it in the clay aisle at the craft store. The Makins brand is very good and the one I would recommend. Bring a coupon or it is on the pricey side.
 
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