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Topic Title: Thaw/ Unfreezing Undecorated Cakes?
Created On Monday October 25, 2010 5:25 PM
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GrndMaCake
Posts: 107
Posted: Monday October 25, 2010 5:25 PM
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Hi I need to thaw several 8" UNdecorated cakes. I baked and froze several single layer white cakes 5 days ago. I will need to have a cake ready to walk out the door in 4 days, completely decorated.

The cakes were wrapped at room temperature (not hot out of the oven or slightly cooled).
Cakes were wrapped in saran/ cling wrap then wrapped in Heavy Duty Aluminum Foil.
Finally Cakes were placed in "Sterlite"TM hard plastic containers with gripping lids.
Freezer is at a temp of 16* (more of a "Store" than a "Freeze" according to thermometer markings)

1. When do I take them out of the freezer to thaw?
2. What is the best method to thaw them?
3. How long do I wait to frost then decorate them?
4. How soon can I put them in a cake carrier to deliver them? (they will need a 45 min transport time)
5. If the cakes are set to sit in a banquet room (possibly untouched) for a good while what are the possible problems that might occur?
6. Is it better to decorate then freeze cakes?? Seems to be what is most talked about on this board. I froze mine to have them ready for the next "thing" not knowing who would want them or how they would want them decorated. Trying to save time... So..
7. Am I better off next time to decorate then freeze?
8. Does the type of cake (white cake, yellow cake, red velvet cake, pound cake) make a difference when unfreezing? (time and precautions)
9. How much time do you give for other sizes? (6", 8", 10" 12" and a half sheet)?
10. Any other words of caution, advice, and experience?


Thank you all for your experience and answers. I have tried to make this a well thought out questionnaire as I was not finding this info in the "searches" I preformed, and thought it would help any of us with these questions to have them all in one place for reference.

A thousand thank yous!
 
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tamicat49
Posts: 36
Posted: Monday October 25, 2010 7:01 PM

gee, I wish I could help but I'm pretty new here too. I did freeze some unfrosted, undecorated cakes but I have not gotten them out of the freezer yet. I too thought it would save some time when they were needed. I am going to pull one out tomarrow & maybe by then you will have an answer. I really haven't had much luck with getting answers on here. Good luck to you.
 
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hartleyflats
Posts: 599
Posted: Monday October 25, 2010 7:21 PM
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I will do my best to help you, even though I'm pretty new to this cake decorating thing too. Here goes:

1. When do I take them out of the freezer to thaw?
It would depend on when you need them for. I am taking a cake out tonight, to decorate for Wednesday. I would say a good 12-16 hours at room temp, probably a little less is safe to make sure it's 100% defrosted.

2. What is the best method to thaw them?
I am taking mine out and just leaving it the way I put it in the freezer to keep moisture in. I don't want to unwrap the cake, then risk it going "stale" or dry out while thawing.

3. How long do I wait to frost then decorate them?
You can begin frosting/decorating when they are 100% defrosted. Any sooner and you risk the "wetness" in the ice crystals in the cake ruining your frosting.

4. How soon can I put them in a cake carrier to deliver them? (they will need a 45 min transport time)?
If you mean after the cake is decorated, you can put it in the cake carrier right away. If you wish the buttercream to crust a little bit, leave it out for about 1/2 an hour before putting in the carrier.

5. If the cakes are set to sit in a banquet room (possibly untouched) for a good while what are the possible problems that might occur?
No problems if the room isn't too warm. Your fondant/buttercream should be okay as long as the room isn't too hot. If the filling or frosting has any dairy in it, the cake can't sit out for long periods of time. It must be kept cold.

6. Is it better to decorate then freeze cakes?? Seems to be what is most talked about on this board. I froze mine to have them ready for the next "thing" not knowing who would want them or how they would want them decorated. Trying to save time... So..
I have heard horror stories about decorated cakes being frozen. The problem arises when you defrost the decorated cake. If the cake has fondant, it will sweat when defrosting and I know someone who's fondant started to peel off because the buttercream sweat and didn't stick to the fondant. If you want to save a little time, maybe just a crumb coat of buttercream would be okay before freezing them.

7. Am I better off next time to decorate then freeze?
See above (LOL)

8. Does the type of cake (white cake, yellow cake, red velvet cake, pound cake) make a difference when unfreezing? (time and precautions)
As long as the consistency of the cake is the same, or close to it, the defrosting time would be the same. For pound cakes, I'd allow a longer defrosting time.

9. How much time do you give for other sizes? (6", 8", 10" 12" and a half sheet)?
Hmmm, maybe increase defrosting time by two hours for larger cakes..not sure on that one, sorry.

10. Any other words of caution, advice, and experience?
Nope!!

Hope I've been able to help a little bit...good luck!!
 
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cakes06
Posts: 11975
Posted: Monday October 25, 2010 8:08 PM
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When I do a wedding cake, I take the frozen cake layers out, fill, put the layers together and crumbcoat while still frozen. They, they're kept in a frig, loosely wrapped to thaw gradually for several hours or overnite. Then, next day, the final coat of frosting goes on and side deco done etc. They go back into the frig. until delivery the next day, taken separately to venue and stacked there.

When doing a smaller cake, i.e. a quarter sheet or small round for a birthday, I still assemble the layers while still frozen with the filling and go ahead and frost them right away without crumbcoating first. If you prefer to wait until they have thawed, then let them thaw in the wrappings so the condensation will mostly absorb. I don't use a tightly sealed cake carrier after they're done but instead just use a bakery box.
 
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JaneBakes
Posts: 230
Posted: Tuesday October 26, 2010 7:55 AM



1. When do I take them out of the freezer to thaw?
I let mine thaw overnight. Depends what size they are--I took out a 9x4 (think banana bread size) yesterday that thawed quickly because it was small.

2. What is the best method to thaw them?
I leave mine wrapped in the plastic wrap, sitting on the counter.

3. How long do I wait to frost then decorate them?
You want them to be thawed.

4. How soon can I put them in a cake carrier to deliver them? (they will need a 45 min transport time)
I let mine crust over a bit so there is less chance of me messing up the sides.

5. If the cakes are set to sit in a banquet room (possibly untouched) for a good while what are the possible problems that might occur?
This made me laugh. Possible problems? Depends how many kids are running around! The wedding cake I did in August had finger swipes from kids. The next one I do, I'm putting out cupcakes for kids to stick their fingers into. Or something. Seriously, as long as the temperature of the room is okay, your cake should be okay. If you want to see what your icing will look like sitting for that length of time, do a test at home. I currently have a cupcake sitting out to see how my icing will look tomorrow.

6. Is it better to decorate then freeze cakes?? Seems to be what is most talked about on this board. I froze mine to have them ready for the next "thing" not knowing who would want them or how they would want them decorated. Trying to save time... So..
You don't want to freeze a decorated cake. I wouldn't be able to get that out without messing it up. I think cakes that are frozen turn out moister. But frozen undecorated.

7. Am I better off next time to decorate then freeze?
8. Does the type of cake (white cake, yellow cake, red velvet cake, pound cake) make a difference when unfreezing? (time and precautions)
I don't think it makes much difference. Maybe really dense cakes would take longer.

9. How much time do you give for other sizes? (6", 8", 10" 12" and a half sheet)?
Of course bigger cakes take longer to get the center thawed, but overnight ought to take care of any of them.

10. Any other words of caution, advice, and experience?
I do a lot of sticking cakes back into the refrigerator for chilling because it makes it easier to handle.
 
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GrndMaCake
Posts: 107
Posted: Wednesday October 27, 2010 10:50 AM
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I can't begin to thank you all enough! I was a little concerned with asking so many questions at once, but with them all kinda tied together I thought it would be good for us to have answers in one place. :P This has been really helpful but unbelievably informative beyond my hopes. THANK YOU!

...and the idea of doing cupcakes to check icing color.... why didn't I think of that? For this particular project that could really be a difference... So it begs a new question....

At what point does icing stop shifting it's color? (It gets darker in time... so when does that stop?) and how much of a role does humidity play in this? Thanks I'll be looking for your answers, and I hope this helps lots of others with the same questions.
 
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mrsellis93
Posts: 1
Posted: Friday March 29, 2013 9:56 AM

cakes06- do you wrap them tightly in the fridge? how do you keep them fresh and keep any "fridge smells" out of the cake? do they stay moist? thanks!

-mrsellis93
 
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cakes06
Posts: 11975
Posted: Friday March 29, 2013 11:20 AM
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Hello ~
I just loosely wrap (double wrap) the cake layers for the freezer. After they're frosted and decorated, if they're wedding tiers, they just go into the frig uncovered. I have four refrigerators, two of which are dedicated for cakes and there's no problems with frig smell. If I do a quarter sheet etc., then they go into bakery boxes and kept in the frig. By the way, welcome to the forum.
 
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gmoakes01
Posts: 6310
Posted: Friday March 29, 2013 12:38 PM
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If I'm sticking cakes in my cake fridge, I don't even wrap in plastic wrap to thaw. It also doesn't hurt to have a box of baking soda in your fridge to absorb any possible odors.

As far as coloring your BC, start a couple of days in advance, let it sit at RT and it should develop it's color by 24 hrs.
 
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