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Topic Title: Evenly Baked Cakes
Created On Tuesday September 29, 2009 6:24 AM
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kmac1
Posts: 49
Posted: Tuesday September 29, 2009 6:24 AM

I have a problem getting my cakes to bake evenly. In the centre tends to wet & uncooked at times. Any hints, tips, techniques and suggestions will be appreciated.
 
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MARIE J
Posts: 12029
Posted: Tuesday September 29, 2009 7:04 AM

Is it just some cakes, or all cakes ? Small cakes or large cakes ?
 
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vanilla sugar
Posts: 70
Posted: Tuesday September 29, 2009 12:38 PM

Is the temperature in your oven too high? I bake all my cakes at 325 farenheight. I also use a flower nail in the middle as a heat conductor if I'm using 10" round pans or bigger (though I haven't baked bigger cakes).
 
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hpjmom
Posts: 14052
Posted: Tuesday September 29, 2009 1:23 PM

I bake all my cakes at 325F. I use Wilton's Bake Even Strips on cakes 8" & up & I use a Flower Nail for cakes 10" & up.

Check the oven temp. to make sure your oven isn't baking too hot.
 
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kmac1
Posts: 49
Posted: Tuesday September 29, 2009 3:50 PM

Some of the cakes cook thoroughly though, not all. I bake at no 4 on my oven which represents 350F. Maybe the oven is too hot.
 
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va_angel1970
Posts: 778
Posted: Saturday October 03, 2009 3:24 AM

What i do is bake on 325 instead of 350 and when i bring the cake(s) out of the oven there is just a liitle hump. So i have a few new kitchen towels i use only for this, immediately after taking the cakes out i lay the towel(s) on the cake and press lightly and viloa the hump dissapears. I used to have the same problem your having until i read about this on here or CC.
Tammie
 
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chinasam
Posts: 1165
Posted: Saturday October 03, 2009 2:13 PM

Interesting that I have read over and over again that you all bake your cakes at 325. I had been baking at 350, and, as Murphy's rule would indicate, the one day I had a very important cake to be made, my cakes started to sink in the middle; come out burnt on the edges and raw in the middle, etc. I increased to 360 and it seems to be better. I have never baked at 325; I am afraid the cake would actually never rise! I got to try that...
 
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chinasam
Posts: 1165
Posted: Saturday October 03, 2009 2:13 PM

Interesting that I have read over and over again that you all bake your cakes at 325. I had been baking at 350, and, as Murphy's rule would indicate, the one day I had a very important cake to be made, my cakes started to sink in the middle; come out burnt on the edges and raw in the middle, etc. I increased to 360 and it seems to be better. I have never baked at 325; I am afraid the cake would actually never rise! I got to try that...
 
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bassettscreek
Posts: 2269
Posted: Monday October 05, 2009 10:10 AM
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Like microwaves, ovens cook from the outside in. Reducing the baking temperature and extending baking time is the solution. I also discovered that using the Wilton baking strips prevent the outer edges of the cake from overbaking, or baking too fast. Love a crust on my cornbread but not my cakes ^_^

Baking with 2 in. or 3 in. deep pans presents new challenges which require ajusting baking temp and times. We must develop a "love/hate" relationship with our ovens ^_^

To avoid disaster, we must discover the "hot" or "cold" nature of our ovens. My oven is fairly consistent and 350 degrees is "hot." If I use dark or coated pans, it is imperative to reduce the baking temperature by 25 degrees, otherwise, the outer edges of cakes and cookies are overbaked. Result, hard cookies and tough, shrunken cakes. I love the "air bake" cookie sheets ... no hard bottoms . ^_^

The "thinner" Wilton pans are designed for consistent heat conduction. The deeper, thinner pans, hold more batter and take a bit longer to cook than the standard 1-1/2 inch pans used my most home bakers. Therefore, it is necessary to reduce the baking temperature by 25 degrees to accomodate the longer baking time required for the center of the cake to finish baking, without cracking.

You might also like to start a "baking" notebook for quick reference. My bakers notebook contains the following information:

Type of Cake Size & Type of Pan(s) Baking Strips (Y)/(N) Baking Temp Baking Time Imperfection

If you bake often, after a time, you'll remember this information without referring to your notebook. For instance, with my chiffon cakes, I use slightly less batter per pan, so my cake does not roll over the sides of my pan.

Another consideration is the "convection" oven feature. I love the convection oven feature of my oven. The fan circulates the "heat" for consistent baking temperature throughout the oven as opposed to the "center sweet spot" of the conventional oven. HOWEVER, with the deeper pans, it is absolutely necessary to reduce the recommended baking temperature by 25 degrees and bake for a period of 50 minutes to an hour.

I always use the "heat strips" when convection baking. Result, level cakes without cracks. Also, the sides and bottom of the cake are not "crusty" and have fewer crumbs.

You might also want to measure your cake batter. Pouring up the batter in 4 Cup glass measing cups enables me to pour the same amount of batter in each pan. Wilton has a chart posted here for 2 in. pans:
http://www.wilton.com/cakes/making-cakes/baking-party-cake-2-inch-pans.cfm

Candy Making, Baking, Decorating = Continuing Education ^_^ Gotta Luv It!

 
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cakesbychrystal
Posts: 2423
Posted: Monday October 05, 2009 7:19 PM
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I use Wilton Bake Even Strips for all my cakes...any cake over 10" I use the wilton heating core. I haven't had a unevenly cooked cake yet...as your cakes get bigger you do need to reduce the heat to 325
 
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KLE's Mom
Posts: 35
Posted: Friday October 09, 2009 12:39 PM

Butter cream cake vs classsic white cake
I have been quiet lately, I am so focused working on flowers I think I am going cross eyed! The wedding is on Sat. 17th, so little time left. As far as I was concerned I was making the butter cream cake. I did try another recipe, Pillsbury website, and it was okay but I was planning to do a trial run with the butter cream today to make the final choice. I just realized the butter cream cake calls for whole eggs. The other cake used only egg whites keeping it white. I now see the classic white uses only whites. I was not going to use the classic white due to the amount of eggs. So can I use only whites in the butter cream, if so how many, or should I look at doing the classic white. Why it took me this long to realize the yolks in the butter cream must be because my head was buried in fondant, but now I have a real dilemma in order to keep to my time schedule here. Help please!
Thanks,
KLE's mom
 
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