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Topic Title: Wilton Icing Shelf Life
Created On Wednesday October 14, 2009 4:09 PM
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starashining
Posts: 14
Posted: Wednesday October 14, 2009 4:09 PM

Can anyone tell me how long the Wilton Icing in tubs and small plastic cans will last if not opened? I would like to buy up some and keep on hand, but do not know how long it will last. I do not know how to read the expiration code on containers.
 
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ladycatisadiva
Posts: 4162
Posted: Thursday October 15, 2009 10:12 AM
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No expiraton date huh? It will probably last forever then. At least until it changes color......
 
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starashining
Posts: 14
Posted: Thursday October 15, 2009 12:25 PM

Actually, products now have a code for expiration, I just don't know how to de-code it.
For example, on the bottom of a 16 oz. can of Wilton White Decorator Icing it has:
9138 XW
WWRTS 21:10
Someone told me once there is a place on the internet to find the code to figure this out, but I
don't remember where to go.
My question was - if un-opened how long can I store this before it goes bad? ( I would like to buy up a lot to have on hand)
Could you possibly freeze until ready to use?
 
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itsfaye
Posts: 1
Posted: Sunday October 18, 2009 12:07 AM

http://consumerist.com/5120395/cheat-sheet-for-sketchy-food-expiration-codes.html

There ya go.
 
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Jeanne G
Posts: 17115
Posted: Sunday October 18, 2009 1:00 AM

Ask Wilton, info@wilton.com

They can tell you how to read the code, and if it is the date manufactured then how long after that it should remain good.
 
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tagood7
Posts: 1
Posted: Friday December 14, 2012 9:33 AM

Just got off the phone with Wilton about their decorating icing tubes expiration dates. So I found out that the code at the top on the back is the date. The first two number is the year it was made and the last numbers are the day of the year and they expire 2 years after the made date open or not. Example: 11027, this was made in 2011 on Jan 27 so it would expire on Jan 27, 2013. Hope this was helpful
 
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Grammyto5
Posts: 465
Posted: Saturday December 15, 2012 12:25 AM

Wilton is the best source for something like this. I had contacted them with an icing issue. I bought a new tub and when I opened it, it looked "funky". When I gave them the code, sure enough, it was very old! I took it back to the store and got a refund.
 
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butternut1
Posts: 1
Posted: Saturday December 15, 2012 2:09 PM

So I have Icing Decorations - I only see a lot # - which is L10190. Is that 2010 and the 190th day of the year? WHY don't they just put the actual expiration date??

 
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cakedujour
Posts: 20871
Posted: Saturday December 15, 2012 4:33 PM
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LOTS of businesses use those convoluted codes on their products, not just Wilton. I wish they all would just use a simple expiration date. Welcome to the forum, butternut1.
 
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tmana
Posts: 223
Posted: Wednesday December 19, 2012 10:01 AM

A lot of foods have very long shelf lives -- much longer than the printed expiration dates. What works better are the "best by" or "better by" dates for shelf-stable foods, and "sell by" dates for "shelf stable" items which lose their consistency and texture, or whose packaging allows for the ingress of unwanted vermin (e.g. breakfast cereals, most packaged pasta), or which have limited shelf lives at ambient temperature (flour, oil).

One thing I learned during the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy is that the "food safety" folk are about twenty times as risk-averse (or brainwashed by Big Food) than our grandmothers were. "Spoiled milk" is the basis of sourdough; hard cheeses are properly kept closer to room temperature than refrigerator temperature; plain yogurt will just continue to develop at warmer temperatures...
 
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