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Topic Title: freezing cake/crumb coat ?s
Created On Wednesday September 02, 2009 11:57 PM
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Manigirl
Posts: 49
Posted: Wednesday September 02, 2009 11:57 PM

i read that feezing is good. cool. wrap good. freeze. with or without crumbcoat is ok. still moist. so im convinced...

my questions:

do you wait for the cake to be TOTALLY thawed to start frosting or can you start before?

what exactly is a crumbcoat? and how do you do it? it sounds like it's just the same frosting you are
going to use but a THIN quick layer to seal in crumbs?



I just made a little 6in cake for my lil girls bday today with buttercream.
i did notice that i had a crumb problem, even though i "dusted" most of it off.
the frosting would "lift" off the cake a little bit...what does that mean, not enough
frosting? im not used to using homemade buttercream so it was hard to get the feel for
frosting the cake...

 
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Jeanne G
Posts: 17115
Posted: Thursday September 03, 2009 12:05 AM

do you wait for the cake to be TOTALLY thawed to start frosting or can you start before?

I wait, yes. And I do that waiting with the cake still wrapped, so any condensation will gather on the wrapper, and not on the cake.

what exactly is a crumbcoat? it sounds like it's just the same frosting you are
going to use but a THIN quick layer to seal in crumbs?

Yes. And in addition to sealing the crumbs against the cake to keep them wandering around in the final frosting, the crumbcoat serves these purposes:
Seals in freshness. Especially helpful if the cake is to sit for several hours or overnight before being frosted.
Provides a nice surface for the final frosting to cling to.
In the case of character cakes, makes the detail easier to see for outlining.

im not used to using homemade buttercream so it was hard to get the feel for
frosting the cake...

I'm not sure what you are used to using, but you might consider buying a big bucket of Wilton's ready-to-use frosting if it is conveniently available to you. This will give you a feel for a good consistency to frost cakes with, and something to aim for with your own frosting.


 
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Manigirl
Posts: 49
Posted: Thursday September 03, 2009 6:38 PM

Thank you Jeanne

so with the crumbcoat...you wait like you normally would for the cake to cool, then just add a thin layer to the cake? are you supposed to add water to the frosting to make it thinner? then after you are done, how long do you wait to frost it again?
 
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Jeanne G
Posts: 17115
Posted: Thursday September 03, 2009 7:07 PM

1. I wait until the cake is thoroughly cool (2 hours).
2. If I am filling the cake, I do that. (Pipe dam, apply filling, put on top, smoosh it down, fill in any gaps where layers meet with frosting)
3. I apply a thin coating of the same crusting buttercream I will frost the same with, full strength. I do not add water. The layer of frosting is thin -- you can see through it -- but the frosting itself is not thinner than normal to frost a cake.
4. I let the crumb coat dry (5 minutes or so).
5. If I have filled the cake I let the layers settle a few hours, sitting on the counter.
6. If I have scheduled this so that I am going to frost and decorate it tomorrow, I leave it sitting on the counter and go to bed or on with my daily activities.
7. If I haven't filled it and it suits my schedule to continue, I go ahead and apply the final coat of frosting (using the icer tip) and move forward from there.

If I am freezing the cake, I do so after the crumb coat is dry, after #4 above.

Does this make it more clear?
 
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sweetgrandma
Posts: 13319
Posted: Thursday September 03, 2009 7:09 PM

no don't add water...just apply enough regular buttercream to make a thin coating on the cake. You'll still be able to see some of the cake and crumbs but that's ok. After it dries completely, finish applying the final coat of bc.
 
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Manigirl
Posts: 49
Posted: Friday September 04, 2009 3:59 AM

thank you Jeanne for ALL the information, i think i'll try freezing and see how it works for me.
apperciate the help!!!
 
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