skip to content

FREE SHIPPING on all orders over $50! *Limited to domestic U.S. orders only.

Discussion Forum

Navigation:
FORUMS > Flowers & Cake Design Wilton Method Course < REFRESH >
Topic Title: instructor and supplies
Created On Friday June 22, 2012 6:23 AM
Topic View:

View thread in raw text format

Sarah Lee
Posts: 10
Posted: Friday June 22, 2012 6:23 AM

Is my instructor suppose to bring her own supplies? Mine doesn't, and I find that very discouraging. Last night she felt it was ok to reach over and say, let me use yours. She took my rose nail and decorator bag to show us how to make the flowers. So I spent part of the class just sitting there watching, while everyone else was particapating. I ask her, shouldn't you bring your own supplies? She told me she's not required to bring anything.??? If I'm expected to bring what I need for these classes souldn't I expect the instructor to do the same. I guess you can tell, I'm a little discouraged. :(
 
Reply
   
Report Violation
   
Top
   
Bottom
     


Spooky_789
Posts: 4968
Posted: Friday June 22, 2012 8:24 AM
View users profile

I would think so. All of mine did. There are several WMIs on here so maybe one of them will pop by and provide their experience.
 
Reply
   
Report Violation
   
Top
   
Bottom
     


Sarah Lee
Posts: 10
Posted: Friday June 22, 2012 9:56 PM

Could a WMI Please answer my question?
Are you suppose to bring your own supplies to class? RI, rose nails, templets.... I had to buy my supplies and I don't appreciate having to supply the teacher with hers.

I would really like to continue my classes, but I need some answers on what I should expect.

Thank You,
Sarah Lee
 
Reply
   
Report Violation
   
Top
   
Bottom
     


LisaH
Posts: 519
Posted: Saturday June 23, 2012 1:18 PM

WMI's are to use (different) student supplies to demonstrate so we can make sure your icing is right and equipment is working properly. Wilton encourages us not to bring our own things after the Course I first lesson. Depending on the course and lesson, I sometimes bring my own stuff but not for Decorating Basics.
 
Reply
   
Report Violation
   
Top
   
Bottom
     


Sarah Lee
Posts: 10
Posted: Saturday June 23, 2012 10:08 PM

Thank You Lisa for letting me know.
I'm in course 2, last week I couldn't do my lilies because by the time I would get my supplies back, my icing would already be hardening. I was so discouraged. I didn't get to do any orchids. But I watched, so I think I've got it.
I'm still not impressed with my instructor. Everyone in the class gets there early, she shows up at 6:30 then we have to wait on her to get ready. Usually around 10 minutes.
But then again, in course 1, I did learn how she bakes her turkeys. I wanted to let her know how to stuff one. LOL
I really want to continue with the courses. I think I'll wait until our local Hobby Lobby gets a new instuructor. This is the first time I've done something for myself in YEARS. And I want to get all I can get out of the classes.
Thanks Again,
Sarah Lee
 
Reply
   
Report Violation
   
Top
   
Bottom
     


LisaH
Posts: 519
Posted: Saturday June 23, 2012 10:21 PM

You can always have a talk with the store manager and/or send an email to Wilton. They don't know there is a problem unless someone speaks up.
I try to be as quick as I can when using students supplies and use a different persons for each thing so no one feels slighted.
Instructors are supposed to be the 30 minutes prior but if she works it may not be possible. What's to "get ready" if she isn't bringing her own stuff?
I'm sorry you aren't having a good time! This is supposed to be a fun thing as well as a learning thing. Maybe you should tell her how (and where) to "stuff her turkey"! ;) You're welcome!!!
 
Reply
   
Report Violation
   
Top
   
Bottom
     


Sarah Lee
Posts: 10
Posted: Saturday June 23, 2012 11:00 PM

Last week she came rushing in at 6:30, clocked in.
I think that's what she was doing, that's how we clock in where I work.
Then she said, we'll get going in a few minutes, I'll be right back. ???
I'm really enjoying the forum, I'm lovin looking at everyone's cakes. Reading their posts.


 
Reply
   
Report Violation
   
Top
   
Bottom
     


BakingByDeb
Posts: 258
Posted: Saturday June 23, 2012 11:40 PM
View users profile

I am an instructor, and while I was told that I can use the students supplies to demo - different students throughout the course, not just one particular student - I do bring my own supplies. For some of the demo portions, if I have already done what I needed to do with mine, I might show with a students stuff how to do something, but I always give ample time to make sure that they can do that item as well.

I agree that you should speak up to the store and to Wilton. No one knows there is a problem unless it is mentioned.

Happy Baking
Deb
 
Reply
   
Report Violation
   
Top
   
Bottom
     


sreis
Posts: 5
Posted: Friday July 06, 2012 4:22 PM

I have taken all the courses Wilton had available in my area. I enjoyed all of them. However our instructor also used items from time to time from students. So I do understand your frustration of not being able to get the flower done, once you got your supplies back. Maybe the instructors should bring their own items when showing the class how to do things. But if she /he needs to test students mixtures, she/he could simply go around the class and do so. I think the class as a whole would get a lot out of understanding issues with different issues. This assumes the students all had different mixtures using the same reciepes. Therefore the instructor could bring her items and the students do not feel slighted for having to purchased mixtures, that the instructor uses to do her class. Some of the pre-fondants can be costly and in todays world cost does matter.
 
Reply
   
Report Violation
   
Top
   
Bottom
     


sreis
Posts: 5
Posted: Friday July 06, 2012 4:22 PM

I have taken all the courses Wilton had available in my area. I enjoyed all of them. However our instructor also used items from time to time from students. So I do understand your frustration of not being able to get the flower done, once you got your supplies back. Maybe the instructors should bring their own items when showing the class how to do things. But if she /he needs to test students mixtures, she/he could simply go around the class and do so. I think the class as a whole would get a lot out of understanding issues with different issues. This assumes the students all had different mixtures using the same reciepes. Therefore the instructor could bring her items and the students do not feel slighted for having to purchased mixtures, that the instructor uses to do her class. Some of the pre-fondants can be costly and in todays world cost does matter.
 
Reply
   
Report Violation
   
Top
   
Bottom
     


LisaH
Posts: 519
Posted: Friday July 06, 2012 5:10 PM

When I use the students fondant, gumpaste, royal icing, buttercream icing - they get the flower. It belongs to them. I always ask "Who wants a free flower" and they usually climb all over each other trying to give me their things to use. Students should pay attention to the teacher THEN do the technique. How does that take anything away from anyone? If you're putzing around on your practice board and not watching the demo you aren't learning much anyway. As the Instructor - that bothers me!
I really don't know why this is such a big deal. Unless the teacher takes 20 minutes to show you something, and doesn't give you back your stuff it shouldn't matter. If it really does bother you - tell her you'd rather she use someone else's (before or after class) and I'm sure she'd be fine with it.
Again, Wilton encourages we WMI's to use our students stuff for many reasons...to check the icing, the equipment, and (I think a big one) so we don't lose our stuff. If I don't bring my supplies - when a student or two, or three, leave half their stuff at home and they ask to borrow my tip 104 over here, a spatula over there, a coupler at the other end of the table - there is a good chance someone (including myself) will forget until after class and out the door my equipment goes never to be seen again. (Yes, I have had this happen). I can honestly say - I'm sorry, I don't have any of those things with me but you may purchase couplers here. You can never have too many couplers. It is really embarrassing to have to ask for things back if a student isn't quick to hand them over. "I thought I gave that back to you". "Well, you didn't"....
So, try to be a little understanding and know it is done this way for a reason. If it really is a problem for you, just say something and I'm sure she'll understand.
 
Reply
   
Report Violation
   
Top
   
Bottom
     


tmana
Posts: 212
Posted: Saturday July 14, 2012 6:47 AM

Our instructor has her own stuff, but if the lesson shows something with alternate equipment (i.e., the suggested additional purchases -- such as the 789 tip for Course 1), she'll ask if a student has one so she can show. Interestingly, most of my classmates have already purchased those additional pieces. If someone is missing something (forgot to pack it that day), usually someone else in the class has a spare to lend for the day. In some of the other classes, I'll sometimes see a student (or the instructor) pop out of class to purchase something he or she needs for that lesson. And almost always, I'll see students from all the classes buying stuff right before, or right after, the class.
 
Reply
   
Report Violation
   
Top
   
Bottom
     


jordansmom
Posts: 248
Posted: Sunday July 22, 2012 9:58 PM

Wilton tells their instructors to use students' supplies, and to make sure they ASK first, but they are supposed to use different students' supplies, and not just go back to the same person over and over. I would imagine one big reason they do this, is to keep costs down. If each instructor had to prepare everything that students do for each class, you can imagine how much time and material cost that would incur. There are four courses that we teach, so that could be 4 (or more!) classes per week. You realize how long it takes to prepare for your class once per week, so you can imagine. They'd have to pay us a lot more, therefore they'd have to increase tuition costs to help cover. We both win this way!

As someone else mentioned, the technique is supposed to be demonstrated FIRST, with students watching, before you try the technique. So if she has your supplies while other people are working, then something isn't right. With that being said, when I have supplies readily available, I do use my own. For example, in Course 1 we have have to demonstrate how to make icing, so I will having icing in a bag already for the next class. Same goes with making royal icing in Course 2. I can use it for the next time. It just depends on the instructor. I do go around the class and check icing consistencies before they fill their bags. Once it's in the bag, it's a lot more work than if you had checked it beforehand.

It sounds like this lady has more issues going on than just using your supplies. As everyone else said, you should mention your unhappiness with your experience to the store manager or to Wilton. Unfortunately, there are a few bad apples out there, and we lose students who take their classes elsewhere, and the stores don't find out about the bad apple until they've lost customers.
 
Reply
   
Report Violation
   
Top
   
Bottom
     


pastelitos
Posts: 445
Posted: Wednesday July 25, 2012 12:38 AM

I agree, while the instructor demonstrate the technique the student is suppose to watch and not practice. By then the instructor is to give back your bag and everyone is to practice at the same time. Wilton does encourage the instructors to use the students icing. I don't see a problem with her using mine. Like someone else said I get to take a pretty flower home and use it as my example.
 
Reply
   
Report Violation
   
Top
   
Bottom
     


Bakes_Bunches
Posts: 125
Posted: Monday July 30, 2012 10:40 PM

My teacher for the old courses did use the student's equipment. She had us prep our supplies for the next item that will be next to be made. Then, she made us leave our supplies at our seat and come to her seat. From there we had to stand around and watch her demo the technique. She did several demos and then all of us returned to our seats to make the item. She then walked around to help if necessary.

She explained in the first class that she would be using our tools and she would be demonstrating the techniques.
 
Reply
   
Report Violation
   
Top
   
Bottom
     


Buddy3236
Posts: 2
Posted: Thursday September 20, 2012 5:10 PM

Sarah Lee, I can't believe you are making such a big deal about this. If you don't want the instructor to use your 'stuff', tell her so. What are you 12? You should not be behind because she is demo-ing at your seat. Everyone should be watching and not doing until she is finished. In our class, everyone WANTS her to use ours so we have a 'perfect' flower to copy. Whoever said to tell the store Manager or tell Willton, REALLY? My instructor only brought her own stuff for the 1st night of the basic course. Why would you expect her to make all of the stuff we have to bring to the class, especially if she teaches more than one course a week. That doesn't even make sense.
 
Reply
   
Report Violation
   
Top
   
Bottom
     


mochamaria
Posts: 22
Posted: Thursday September 27, 2012 7:45 PM

I am also an instructor, and I've always brought my own supplies for the 7+ years I've taught. I put myself in the position of a student; I know that there are a lot of students that want to jump in and do the techniques along with me (rather than wait until after I've demoed them, as is the goal) and I know if I was a student I would not be too keen on having someone else use my supplies. That said, Wilton does encourage instructors to demo techniques using students' supplies, but also advises them to ask permission first. Wilton also encourages instructors to arrive around 30 minutes before lessons. I'm sorry your instructor is not following these guidelines, and I agree you should either call it to the attention of the instructor, the store manager, or Wilton.

I, too, think about how expensive fondant/gumpaste is for Courses 2, 3 and 4 and I would not want my instructor to use mine if I was a student. I realize that buying my own means that I spend more/make less money as an instructor, but I can always use those finished pieces as samples to show future/potential students what we do in class and/or create displays to promote classes. And I would rather make less money than risk students having a less than positive experience because I've used their supplies.
 
Reply
   
Report Violation
   
Top
   
Bottom
     


ladymac
Posts: 136
Posted: Tuesday December 11, 2012 7:45 PM

I am a WMI and we are told to demo using students' supplies - after asking, of course. We are also to rotate whose supplies we use. As someone already noted, this is partly to check equipment, icing, etc.

It is also so that students do not rely on us to constantly have what they should remember to bring in the first place. When I was a new WMI, I decided to be nice and load up everything every week. Guess what happened? My students quit remembering to bring anything. They counted on me to have any and everything. It slows down the class when there is a constant, "Oh, I forgot X, can I borrow yours?" Students have to learn to be responsible and bring their own supplies.

Also, we are not reimbursed for any of our supplies. Not for icing ingredients, not for equipment - nothing. Every single supply we have comes out of our pockets.

If a WMI is demoing correctly, no student should be "out" any extraordinary amount of anything. And, during the demo, all students should be watching, not working. Any particular demo should only take a couple of minutes, so a student whose equipment is used should not lose any class time.
 
Reply
   
Report Violation
   
Top
   
Bottom
     


jordansmom
Posts: 248
Posted: Wednesday December 12, 2012 5:48 AM

Great points, ladymac!
 
Reply
   
Report Violation
   
Top
   
Bottom
     

View thread in raw text format
FORUMS > Flowers & Cake Design Wilton Method Course < REFRESH >
Navigation: