Bake Mini Pumpkin Cakes Filled with Autumn Flavor

October 11th, 2011 by Cassie Dietrich

My sister is a gourmet cook who loves to entertain at home. At any given time, Cindy can pull together a dinner party for 25 using only what is stocked in the pantry and fridge. Food Network should be filming in her kitchen! So when Cindy asked me for dessert ideas for her upcoming fall dinner party, I knew I had to come up with a grand finale to cap off an amazing meal.

Since pumpkins are gifts of fall, I knew right away that I wanted to use my Dimensions® Multi-Cavity Mini Pumpkins Pan. What I love about this pan is its ease of use. Basically just fill, bake and assemble.

Dimensions® Multi-Cavity Mini Pumpkins Pan

One staple in my pantry is Cake Release. Using my silicone Pastry Brush, I coated the pan quickly and evenly. I now had no fear that my pumpkins would release without any casualties!

Dimensions® Multi-Cavity Mini Pumpkins Pan Batter

To continue the pumpkin theme, I filled each cavity 2/3 full with a pumpkin pound cake recipe and baked them. While the mini cakes cooled (love my 14 1/2 x 20 in. Chrome-Plated Cooling Grid), I prepared a cream cheese icing. On the cooled pumpkin half, I piped frosting in a 1M swirl using my 4B tip and disposable decorating bag before adding the pumpkin top.

Filling the Mini Pumpkin Cake

Now my mini cakes were ready to plate! I crumbled a nut brittle and drizzled a caramel cream sauce to give my dessert that WOW factor, then finished off with a dusting of powdered sugar and a mint leaf. My dessert was now dressed to impress!

Mini Pumpkin Cake

Cassie Dietrich Cassie is an Associate Product Manager for Party. A self-professed foodie, Cassie has been collecting cookbooks since she was young. Her most treasured one was passed down from her mother’s 1957 bridal shower. Known for making delectable homemade truffles and marshmallows, family and friends know to put their Holiday requests in early! Besides spending time with her nieces and nephews, Cassie is an avid football fan (Go Bears!) and yoga enthusiast (Namaste).

12 Replies

  1. Al says:

    Is there anything that’s larger?

  2. Cassie Dietrich says:

    Hello Al, thank you for your inquiry. Unfortunately, the Dimensions® Large Pumpkin Pan has been discontinued. Have a great day – Cassie

  3. Letty says:

    This looks pretty and yummy!

  4. Dorothy says:

    Another thing you could do with them is only use half (instead of putting it together like the picture) and drizzle a powered sugar glaze on each one. It would almost be like a individual mini pumpkin bunt cake then. :)

  5. Jodi says:

    Hi Cassie,

    I’m ordering my pan today, I can’t wait to use it. Can you share your pumpkin pound cake recipe you used with the pan? How many did it yield?

    • Cassie Dietrich says:

      Hello Jodi — I did an internet search for pumpkin pound cake recipes and followed one that called for a box mix and canned pumpkin. After I filled the pumpkin cavities 2/3 full, I had extra batter to fill a small loaf pan. Enjoy your pan. It is an excellent addition to your bakeware collection!

  6. Dee says:

    Al, when making a larger pumpkin I use 2 bunt cakes…. you can buy different size bunt pans. works the same. Happy Baking.

  7. alice says:

    Its yummy yummy.

  8. anonymous says:

    Jesus loves Hanes

  9. Krisi Schlueter says:

    Wow! This is great. I am having a holiday party and your blog really helped me decide what desert to prepare. The mini pumpkin cakes are so cute. I can’t wait to see what you have in store for Christmas!

  10. When i seen these, they reminded me of the pumpkin snickerdoodle whoopie pies i make. It got me to thinking: if i had that pan (or a similar one for cookies) and used it for my cookies- that would give them a nice festive look to go with the thanksgiving meal. Or maybe i can just use a little icing to draw the line segments on them and add a little green icing to represent a stem and add a spearmint candy leaf so they will look like pumpkins. Thanks for giving me the idea.

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